109 – Have Strong Bones for Life – My Interview with Lara Pizzorno

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Your Bones – How You Can Prevent Osteoporosis

Lara PizzornoPrint TranscriptLara Pizzorno had osteopenia by age fifty and was headed towards early osteoporosis. Her family history was grim. Every woman in her family had died of a complication of osteoporosis. She discovered that the women in her family had a genetic trait that inhibited the uptake of vitamin D, placing her a greater risk. About 20% of American women have this genetic trait. Her osteoporosis continued to progress even though she was taking preventive supplements. Something is wrong with this picture. It is the same disturbing problem faced by millions of women who are facing osteoporosis and don’t know what to do. The only medical advice these days is to take the drugs. What can women do? You have heard the story of my wife’s reversal of osteoporosis on a previous podcast. Lara journey is very similar.

The past decade has revealed that there are nutrients that can indeed reverse osteoporosis. Lara is a perfect example of how these nutrients have been proven to help reverse osteoporosis. Lara, who is now in her mid-60’s can point to her own success in reversing bone loss, even though she had multiple risk factors including the genetic family trait.

When in her mid-forties, the author, now 63, was diagnosed with osteopenia–a loss of bone density that is the precursor to osteoporosis. Today, by following the recommendations discussed in this book, she has strong, healthy bones and will be the first woman in generations in her family not to die from osteoporosis. The bisphosphonate drugs prescribed for osteoporosis—eg Fosamax, Boniva — should be your last choice: not only do they have numerous nasty side effects, they cause retention of old, brittle bone instead of creating new, healthy bone and actually promote fractures! Your Bones will teach you how to identify those factors in your life that are putting your bones at risk and will arm you with the cutting edge information you need to have healthy bones for life, naturally—relying on diet, exercise and supplements. Every statement this book is backed up with peer-reviewed medical research. Your Bones is an essential handbook for anyone wanting to prevent osteoporosis in later life.

Osteoporosis has become a common scourge, afflicting people—especially women—in ever-growing numbers. Yet osteoporosis drugs like Fosamax® or Boniva® are dangerous—not only do they actually increase your risk for bone fractures, they may also cause heart problems and kill bone tissue in your jaw.

Book - Your BonesAre women genetically programmed to develop weak, brittle bones? The answer is an emphatic “No!” Your Bones uncovers the real culprits responsible for the osteoporosis epidemic. It will not only teach you how to identify those factors in your life that are putting your bones at risk; it will also arm you with the cutting-edge information you need to prevent osteoporosis and maintain strong, healthy bones for life—naturally, relying on diet, supplements and exercise.

As you now know, bone is dynamic, living tissue that is constantly being broken down and rebuilt, regardless of one’s age or sex. Until recently, not getting enough calcium and women’s postmenopausal drop in estrogen were singled out as the only issues. Today, vitamin D’s importance for bone health is once again being recognized. It’s true that calcium, vitamin D, and estrogen play key roles in preventing osteoporosis, but maintaining healthy bones throughout life requires a good deal more than simply calcium, estrogen and vitamin D.  Normal bone metabolism is a complex dance among over two dozen nutrients including the vitamins K (especially K2), B6, B12, and folate as well as vitamin D, and the minerals boron, magnesium, phosphorous, zinc, manganese, copper, silicon, molybdenum, selenium– and possibly strontium–as well as calcium.

About Lara Pizzorno

Lara Pizzorno is the Editor of Longevity Medicine Review as well as Senior Medical Editor for SaluGenecists, Inc. In addition to reviewing the latest in longevity research for clinicians, Lara summarizes health & nutrition research for the Textbook of Natural Medicine e-dition, When in her mid-forties, the author, now 63, was diagnosed with osteopenia–a loss of bone density that is the precursor to osteoporosis. Today, by following the recommendations discussed in this book, she has strong, healthy bones and will be the first woman in generations in her family not to die from osteoporosis.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Danilo Perlas,MD May 4, 2014 at 10:52 pm

Hi, Lara, I really enjoy your book – Your Bones. I would like to buy Algaecalcium plus . I could not find in the internet the Manufacturer of Algaecalcium. There is a distributor in Vancouver, Canada but I think it is important to know the name of the company who makes it. So, I am still reluctant to place an order. About the strontium you did not mention in your book about the strontium serum level that needs to be checked periodically if someone is taking a huge dose of strontium which can accumulate in your blood and can cause kidney damage similar to hypercalcemia. There are lots of elderly osteoporotic patients and majority of them have already reduced kidney function. I’ll appreciate your comments. thank you- Dan Perlas

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2 Steve Lankford May 5, 2014 at 9:58 am

Hello Danilo,
Lara is not on this site and so will not be able to respond. You can listen to my interview with Dean Neuls, President of AlgaeCal at this link. https://www.healthquestpodcast.com/032-the-worlds-first-plant-based-calcium-algaecal-my-interview-with-dean-neuls/. You can learn more at their site algaecal.com.

My wife has taken strontium for 8 years along with other nutrients and her bone density has improved by 7 percentage points over 7 years. You can hear her story here: https://www.healthquestpodcast.com/105-how-to-build-strong-healthy-bones-for-a-lifetime-with-steve-lankford/

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